LC
Olive-backed Pipit Anthus hodgsoni



Justification

Justification of Red List Category
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Population justification
The global population size has not been quantified, though in Europe, the breeding population is estimated to number 45,000-60,000 pairs, which equates to 90,000-120,000 mature individuals (BirdLife International 2015), with Europe forming <5% of the global range. National population estimates include: c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs, c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration and c.1,000-10,000 wintering individuals in China; c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration and c.1,000-10,000 wintering individuals in Taiwan; c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs, c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration and c.1,000-10,000 wintering individuals in Japan and c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs and c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration in Russia (Brazil 2009).

Trend justification
The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence for any declines or substantial threats.

Ecology

This species breeds on the edge of taiga, on grassy and bracken-covered slopes, rocky ground and in glades in open forest of oak (Quercus), birch (Betula), alder (Alnus), fir (Abies) or pine (Pinus). It is also found in secondary growth and wooded or abandoned cultivation and scrub with isolated trees, and on barren lava areas, around marshes and shady areas in paddyfields. It also frequents dwarf juniper (Juniperus) or other scrub above the timber-line. It breeds from June to August in western Siberia and from May to the end of July/August in the south of the range. The nest is a cup of moss and dry grass, lined with finer grass and a few hairs and sited on the ground under a tuft of grass or a rock, or in a shallow depression. Clutches are usually from three to five eggs (Tyler 2016). It feeds on mostly insects in the summer and seeds in the winter.  The species is a long-distance migrant (Snow and Perrins 1998).

Conservation actions

Conservation Actions Underway
Bern Convention Appendix II.

Conservation Actions Proposed

No conservation measures are currently needed for this species within Europe.

Acknowledgements

Text account compilers
Butchart, S. & Ekstrom, J.


Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2019) Species factsheet: Anthus hodgsoni. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 22/09/2019. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2019) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 22/09/2019.