NT
Grey Petrel Procellaria cinerea



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Red List Category

Criteria: A2cde+3cde+4cde

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Justification of Red List category
Although there are no current trend data, this species is susceptible to introduced mammalian predators, having been extirpated from Macquarie Island by cats and rats, and today it is the most commonly caught bycatch species in longline fisheries in New Zealand waters. Evidence from Gough Island, formerly thought to contain the largest population of this species, suggest that the species is likely to be subjected to considerable predation from introduced mice that are a major predator on other winter-breeding seabirds. The population on the Kerguelen Islands may also be in decline due to fishery bycatch. Based on these data a moderately rapid decline is suspected and as such the species is listed as Near Threatened, but further data are urgently required in order to more accurately assess its population numbers and trends.

Population size: mature individuals

Population trend: Decreasing

Distribution size (breeding/resident): 74,400,000 km2

Country endemic: No

Attributes
Land-mass type - oceanic island - Oceanic islands are islands or island groups that are <200,000 sq km in size and separated from other land masses by >200 m sea depth. Generally Oceanic islands are islands or island groups that are <200,000 sq km in size and separated from other land masses by >200 m sea depth. Generally they have never been connected to a continental area by a land-ridge, and are volcanic in origin.
Realm - Afrotropical - realm
Realm - Neotropical - realm
Realm - Oceanic - realm
Realm - Antarctic - realm
IUCN Ecosystem -- Terrestrial biome
IUCN Ecosystem -- Marine biome

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2016) Species factsheet: Procellaria cinerea. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 04/12/2016. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2016) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 04/12/2016.