VU
Taita Falcon Falco fasciinucha



Taxonomy

Taxonomic source(s)
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A. and Fishpool, L.D.C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 1: Non-passerines. Lynx Edicions BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- - A2ab+3b+4ab; C2a(i); D1

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2020 Vulnerable A2ab+3b+4ab; C2a(i); D1
2016 Vulnerable C2a(i); D1
2014 Vulnerable C2a(i); D1
2012 Near Threatened C2a(ii);D1
2008 Near Threatened C2a(ii); D1
2004 Near Threatened
2000 Lower Risk/Near Threatened
1996 Vulnerable
1994 Vulnerable
1988 Near Threatened
Species attributes

Migratory status not a migrant Forest dependency Low
Land mass type Land-mass type - continent
Average mass -
Distribution

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 2,690,000 medium
Number of locations -
Severely Fragmented -
Population and trend
Value Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals 500-1000 poor estimated 2008
Population trend Decreasing estimated -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) 30-49 - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) 30-39 - - -
Number of subpopulations 2-100 - - -
Percentage in largest subpopulation - - -
Generation length (yrs) 4.1 - - -

Population justification: It has been estimated that there are probably more than 1,000 mature individuals (Thomsett 1998), although more recently it was stated that there are probably substantially fewer than 500 pairs (Jenkins et al. 2008). The population is therefore estimated to number 500-1,000 mature individuals, assumed to equate to c.750-1,500 individuals in total.

Trend justification: The population is estimated to be in decline, based on evidence of reduced territory occupation in some areas, such as Zimbabwe and South Africa, during recent years (A. Jenkins in litt. 2012, 2014; Jenkins et al., 2019). Recent data for South Africa reports a 30% decrease in breeding individuals between 2011 and 2019 (A. Jenkins in litt2012; K. Walker pers. comm. 2020), equating to a 42% reduction rate over three generations. Additionally, a 2013 survey in Zimbabwe found no territories in an area that once contained 12 breeding individuals c.1994 (Jenkins et al., 2019). These survey data are difficult to interpret given the limited time span of observations and the species's erratic occupancy of breeding territories, however the rate of decline over three generations is precautionarily suspected to fall in the 30-49% band.


Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Botswana N Extant Yes
Ethiopia N Extant Yes
Kenya N Extant Yes
Malawi N Extant Yes
Mozambique N Extant Yes
South Africa N Extant Yes
South Sudan N Extant Yes
Tanzania N Extant Yes
Uganda N Extant Yes
Zambia N Extant Yes
Zimbabwe N Extant Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name
Kenya Taita Hills Forests
Kenya Ol Donyo Sabache
Malawi Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve
Mozambique Chimanimani Mountains (Mozambique)
Tanzania Ngorongoro Conservation Area
Tanzania West Usambara Mountains
Zambia Mosi-Oa-Tunya National Park and Batoka Gorge
Zimbabwe Nyanga mountains
Zimbabwe Chimanimani Mountains (Zimbabwe)
Zimbabwe Haroni - Rusitu junction and Botanical Reserves
Zimbabwe Chizarira National Park
Zimbabwe Batoka Gorge
Zambia Wonder Gorge
Kenya Kwenia
Kenya Lolldaiga-Mugogodo-Ewaso N'yiro
Tanzania Masai Steppe

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Artificial/Terrestrial Arable Land suitable non-breeding
Artificial/Terrestrial Pastureland suitable non-breeding
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Dry major resident
Rocky areas (eg. inland cliffs, mountain peaks) major resident
Savanna Dry suitable resident
Shrubland Subtropical/Tropical Dry suitable resident
Altitude 600 - 3800 m Occasional altitudinal limits  

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Human intrusions & disturbance Recreational activities Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Species disturbance
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Problematic native species/diseases - Bubo africanus Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Reduced reproductive success
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Problematic native species/diseases - Falco biarmicus Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Reduced reproductive success
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Problematic native species/diseases - Falco peregrinus Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Competition, Reduced reproductive success
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Problematic native species/diseases - Named species Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Reduced reproductive success
Natural system modifications Dams & water management/use - Large dams Timing Scope Severity Impact
Future Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 3
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Pollution Agricultural & forestry effluents - Herbicides and pesticides Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Reduced reproductive success, Species mortality

Utilisation
Purpose Primary form used Life stage used Source Scale Level Timing
Pets/display animals, horticulture - - International Non-trivial Recent

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2021) Species factsheet: Falco fasciinucha. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 20/10/2021. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2021) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 20/10/2021.