NT
Sumatran Woodpecker Picus dedemi



Justification

Justification of Red List Category
This newly-split species is listed as Near Threatened on the basis that it is suspected to be in moderately rapid population decline (approaching 30% over three generations [c.17 years]) owing to on-going habitat loss and degradation. The rate of decline is not thought to be more rapid because the species shows some tolerance of habitat modification and fragmentation, and occurs in montane areas, thus it is not exposed to the most rapid rates of deforestation in the region. Further information on the population size, trend and severity of threats could lead to its reclassification to a higher category of threat.

Population justification
The population size has not been estimated owing to recent taxonomic splits.

Trend justification
Deforestation and forest degradation are occurring rapidly in Sumatra, with 35.7% of the primary forest cover in 1990 lost by 2010, and an additional 11% of primary forest cover in 1990 degraded by 2010, although much primary forest in highland areas remains intact (Margono et al. 2012). The species is therefore suspected to be in moderately rapid population decline (approaching 30% over three generations [c.17 years]) owing to on-going habitat loss and degradation. The rate of decline is not thought to be more rapid because the species shows some tolerance of habitat modification and fragmentation, and occurs in montane areas, thus it is not exposed to the most rapid rates of deforestation in the region.

Distribution and population

P. dedemi is endemic to Sumatra, Indonesia, where it occurs in forest and woodland habitats in montane areas (Winkler et al. 1995, del Hoyo et al. 2002).

Ecology

Occurs in evergreen montane forest from about 1,000 m up to 2,000 m in Sumatra (Winkler et al. 1995, del Hoyo et al. 2002). The species appears to tolerate some level of habitat modification, making use of bamboo groves in second growth (Winkler et al. 1995).

Threats

Deforestation and forest degradation are occurring rapidly in Sumatra, with 35.7% of the primary forest cover in 1990 lost by 2010, and an additional 11% of primary forest cover in 1990 degraded by 2010, although much primary forest in highland areas remains intact (Margono et al. 2012).

Conservation actions

Conservation and research actions underway
No targeted conservation actions are known. The species occurs in Kerinci-Seblat and Gunung Leuser National Parks (D. L. Yong in litt. 2014).

Conservation and research actions proposed
Determine its precise ecological requirements and its ability to persist in degraded and fragmented habitats. Ensure the effective protection of existing protected areas in which it occurs.

Identification

26-33cm. Deep brownish red upperparts, greyish red underparts, bright red rump and greyish face with dark cap and black malar; bright red forecrown in male. Similar spp. P. canus robinsoni occurs in peninsular Malaysia (no overlap) and has dark coppery-green plumage rather than red. P. miniaceus is barred black and white below and has a bright red head with crest.

Acknowledgements

Text account compilers
Westrip, J., Taylor, J., Ekstrom, J., Butchart, S., Martin, R, Symes, A.

Contributors
Iqbal, M., Yong, D.


Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2021) Species factsheet: Picus dedemi. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 16/01/2021. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2021) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 16/01/2021.