LC
Siberian Rubythroat Calliope calliope



Justification

Justification of Red List Category
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Population justification
The global population size has not been quantified, though in Europe, the breeding population is estimated to number 1,000-1,200 pairs, which equates to 2,000-2,400 mature individuals (BirdLife International 2015), with Europe forming <5% of the global range. National population estimates include: c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs, c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration and c.1,000-10,000 wintering individuals in China; c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration and c.1,000-10,000 wintering individuals in Taiwan; c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs and c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration in Korea; c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs, c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration and c.50-1,000 wintering individuals in Japan and c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs and c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration in Russia (Brazil 2009).

Trend justification
The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence for any declines or substantial threats. The European population trend is unknown (BirdLife International 2015).

Ecology

During the breeding season this species is found in lowland taiga and subalpine shrubbery, clearings in forests by meadows and rivers, windfall gaps, regenerating burns with tall grass and bushes, birch coppices, clumps and stands of willow and aspen in bogs, patches of montane dwarf pine, krummholz above tree-line, overgrown forest edges and tangled thickets near mountain streams. It favours areas with fallen trees, dense bushes and stands of bird cherry (Prunus padus) and dog rose (Rosa canina), usually near fir (Abies) and spruce (Picea) stands and riverine meadows. In Russia it breeds from May to July and possibly August. It breeds from May to July in China and North Korea. In Japan it breeds from June to August. The nest is a loose cup or dome made of fine grasses and roots, usually lightly lined with hair and plant down, placed on the ground in the shelter of a bush or dense tuft of herbage. Clutches are four to six eggs. It is insectivorous, taking flies and their larvae, ants, wasps and beetles and also some plant material. The species is migratory, wintering in south-east Asia (Collar 2015).

Threats

In the mid-20th century it was reportedly very popular with Chinese bird-fanciers owing to its colourful plumage and voice, but the impact of trade is currently unknown (Collar 2015).

Conservation actions

Conservation Actions Underway
CMS Appendix II. There are currently no known conservation measures for this species within its small European range.

Conservation Actions Proposed
No conservation measures are currently needed for this species within its small European range.

Acknowledgements

Text account compilers
Ashpole, J, Butchart, S., Ekstrom, J.


Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2022) Species factsheet: Calliope calliope. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 16/08/2022. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2022) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 16/08/2022.