NT
Ringed Storm-petrel Hydrobates hornbyi



Taxonomy

Taxonomic note
Hydrobates hornbyi (del Hoyo and Collar 2014) was previously placed in the genus Oceanodroma.

Taxonomic source(s)
Brooke, M. de L. 2004. Albatrosses and Petrels Across the World. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A. and Fishpool, L.D.C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 1: Non-passerines. Lynx Edicions BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.
SACC. 2005 and updates. A classification of the bird species of South America. Available at: #http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.htm#.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- - -

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2019 Near Threatened B2b(iii)
2018 Data Deficient
2016 Data Deficient
2012 Data Deficient
2010 Data Deficient
2008 Data Deficient
2004 Data Deficient
2000 Data Deficient
1996 Data Deficient
1994 Data Deficient
1988 Threatened
Species attributes

Migratory status not a migrant Forest dependency Does not normally occur in forest
Land mass type Average mass -
Extent of occurrence (EOO)

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 2,560,000 medium
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 2,000
Number of locations -
Fragmentation -
Population and trend
Estimate Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals 500000-800000 medium estimated 2007
Population trend Decreasing suspected -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) - - -
Number of subpopulations - - -
Largest subpopulations - - -
Generation length (yrs) 16 - - -

Population justification: Brooke (2004) suspected the global population to number at least thousands of individuals, and probably tens of thousands. Marine surveys in the 1980s-1990s led to an estimated abundance of 637,200 in spring (95% CI: 0.5-0.8 million) and 1,011,900 in autumn (95% CI: 900,000-1,500,000) (Spear and Ainley 2007). Assuming the lower population estimates in spring represent mature individuals, we can derive from these surveys a population estimate of 500,000-800,000 mature individuals. The subpopulation structure is not known.

Trend justification: The species may be declining as a result of threats, including light pollution, but we have no data from which to quantify population trends.


Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Chile N Extant Yes
Ecuador N Extant Yes
Peru N Extant Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name
Peru Reserva Nacional de Paracas
Peru Río Tambo y Lagunas de Mejía

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Desert Cold major breeding
Marine Neritic Macroalgal/Kelp suitable resident
Marine Neritic Pelagic major resident
Marine Neritic Seagrass (Submerged) suitable resident
Marine Neritic Subtidal Loose Rock/pebble/gravel suitable resident
Marine Neritic Subtidal Rock and Rocky Reefs suitable resident
Marine Neritic Subtidal Sandy suitable resident
Marine Neritic Subtidal Sandy-Mud suitable resident
Marine Oceanic Epipelagic (0-200m) major resident
Marine Oceanic Mesopelagic (200-1000m) major resident
Altitude   Occasional altitudinal limits (max) 3400 m

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Energy production & mining Mining & quarrying Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Unknown Unknown
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Energy production & mining Renewable energy Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Unknown Unknown
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Pollution Excess energy - Light pollution Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Unknown Unknown
Stresses
Reduced reproductive success, Species mortality
Transportation & service corridors Roads & railroads Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Unknown Unknown
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Transportation & service corridors Utility & service lines Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Unknown Unknown
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2020) Species factsheet: Hydrobates hornbyi. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 26/02/2020. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2020) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 26/02/2020.