NT
Perija Tapaculo Scytalopus perijanus



Taxonomy

Taxonomic note

Scytalopus perijanus (del Hoyo and Collar 2016) is recognized as a species following work by Avendaño et al. (2015).

Taxonomic source(s)
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A., Fishpool, L.D.C., Boesman, P. and Kirwan, G.M. 2016. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 2: Passerines. Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- - -

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2021 Near Threatened B1ab(ii,iii,v)+2ab(ii,iii,v)
2016 Vulnerable C2a(ii)
Species attributes

Migratory status not a migrant Forest dependency Medium
Land mass type Average mass -
Distribution

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 3,600
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 1,480
Number of locations 11-100 -
Severely Fragmented -
Population and trend
Value Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals 10000-19999 poor inferred 2021
Population trend Decreasing inferred -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) 1-15 - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) 1-15 - - -
Number of subpopulations 2-10 - - -
Percentage in largest subpopulation 1-89 - - -

Population justification: The population size of this species has not been quantified. A preliminary population estimate was derived from a congener with similar habitat requirements, the Ecuadorian Tapaculo (Scytalopus robbinsi); this species occurs at a density of c. 27 mature individuals per km2 in suitable forest (Hermes et al. 2017). Assuming that the Perija Tapaculo occurs at a similar density, and further assuming that up to 75% of forests within the range offer suitable habitat (i.e. c.700 km2; Global Forest Watch 2021), the population may number c.19,000 mature individuals. To account for uncertainty, the population size is here preliminarily placed in the band 10,000-19,999 mature individuals.
The population structure has not been assessed, but based on observational records (eBird 2021) it is conceivable that the species forms several subpopulations.

Trend justification: The population trend has not been assessed directly, but the species is thought to decline due to habitat loss (Renjifo et al. 2016; del Hoyo et al. 2020). Over the past ten years, 2% of tree cover has been lost within the range (Global Forest Watch 2021). Considering that the species is also found in shrubby and secondary growth adjacent to forest (Avendaño et al. 2015; Renjifo et al. 2016; del Hoyo et al. 2020), population declines have likely been very low over the past ten years, not exceeding 10% over this period. In 2017 however, tree cover loss peaked at 0.63% per year, before falling again to negligible levels of <1% (Global Forest Watch 2021). Should deforestation rates increase to similarly high levels in the near future, up to 6% of tree cover may be lost within the range over the next ten years. Precautionarily, future population declines are therefore placed in the band 1-15% over the next ten years.


Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Colombia N Extant Yes
Venezuela N Extant Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name
Venezuela Parque Nacional Perijá
Venezuela Zona Protectora San Rafael de Guasare
Colombia Cerro Pintado (Serranía de Perijá)

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Artificial/Terrestrial Plantations marginal resident
Artificial/Terrestrial Subtropical/Tropical Heavily Degraded Former Forest marginal resident
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane major resident
Shrubland Subtropical/Tropical High Altitude suitable resident
Altitude 1600 - 3225 m Occasional altitudinal limits  

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Small-holder farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Agriculture & aquaculture Livestock farming & ranching - Small-holder grazing, ranching or farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Energy production & mining Mining & quarrying Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation
Residential & commercial development Housing & urban areas Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem conversion
Transportation & service corridors Roads & railroads Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2022) Species factsheet: Scytalopus perijanus. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 09/12/2022. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2022) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 09/12/2022.