LC
Oriental Pied Hornbill Anthracoceros albirostris



Justification

Justification of Red List Category
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (extent of occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern. Should the species be found to be declining, it may warrant uplisting to a higher threat category.

Population justification
The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is reported to be the commonest Asian hornbill (del Hoyo et al. 2001).

Trend justification
The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence for any declines or substantial threats.

Distribution and population

Anthracoceros albirostris is a widespread resident in northern South Asia, southern China, Indochina and western Indonesia.

Threats

It was recently noted that this species has been almost completely extirpated from southern China (J. Fellowes in litt. 2010). In the Thai-Malay Peninsula, the species may be threatened by off-take for the trade in fledglings and outright forest clearance (Wells 1999). There is some evidence that the species has traditionally been captured for the local pet trade, as historically one to two were reportedly kept in every village in at least some areas of Myanmar (Tickell 1864 in Kemp 1995). The casques of Oriental Pied Hornbills are common souvenirs in the markets of Thailand, Laos and Vietnam; however, the extent of this trade has not been measured (Kinnaird and O’Brien 2007). However, this species is considered the most adaptable of the hornbills to landscape modification and thus the least threatened owing to its very wide range, small size and broad habitat preferences (S. Mahood in litt. 2012, D. Bakewell in litt. 2012).

Conservation actions

Conservation measures underway
The provision of artificial nest space in Singapore has secured the return of the species as a nesting breeder, with 50-60 individuals in 2010 (G. Davison in litt. 2012).

Conservation measures proposed
Conduct research to determine the population size and trend.

Acknowledgements

Text account compilers
Butchart, S., Derhé, M., Ekstrom, J.

Contributors
Davison, G., Duckworth, W., Bakewell, D., Kemp, A.C., Thompson, P., Mahood, S., Goes, F.


Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2019) Species factsheet: Anthracoceros albirostris. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 08/12/2019. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2019) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 08/12/2019.