NT
Ogea Monarch Mayrornis versicolor



Taxonomy

Taxonomic source(s)
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A., Fishpool, L.D.C., Boesman, P. and Kirwan, G.M. 2016. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 2: Passerines. Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- - -

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2022 Near Threatened D1
2016 Near Threatened D2
2015 Near Threatened D2
2012 Vulnerable D2
2008 Vulnerable D2
2004 Vulnerable
2000 Vulnerable
1996 Vulnerable
1994 Vulnerable
1988 Near Threatened
Species attributes

Migratory status not a migrant Forest dependency High
Land mass type Average mass -
Distribution

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 28 medium
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 18
Number of locations -
Severely Fragmented -
Population and trend
Value Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals 1300-2000 medium estimated 2011
Population trend Stable poor suspected -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) - - -
Number of subpopulations - - -
Percentage in largest subpopulation - - -
Generation length (yrs) 3.53 - - -

Population justification: In 1986, the species was estimated to have a total population of c.2,000 individuals (Watling 1988). Surveys conducted on Ogea Levu and Ogea Driki in July 2011 (following Watling's [1988] methodology) recorded 49 individuals, equating to 19.22 per 10 ha (Andersen et al. 2012), compared with 10.68 per 10 ha in 1986 (Watling 1988). Crude extrapolation from these data yields a current estimate of 3,204 individuals compared with 1,780 in 1986 (Watling 1988). However, this is based on surveys conducted over three days and it is difficult to draw firm conclusions about the true population size and whether this apparent change in the population size represents a genuine increase or simple variation in the population. No more recent population estimate has been made, and thus the population is estimated to number 2,000-3,000 individuals, based on Watling (1988) and Andersen et al. (2012). This equates to 1,333-2,000 mature individuals, rounded here to 1,300-2,000 mature individuals.

Trend justification: The species is tolerant of habitat degradation and does not appear to be declining despite the presence of introduced predators. Based on results from Andersen et al.'s (2012) survey, there appears to be no evidence for a population decline and there is no more recent trend assessment. Consequently, its population is assessed as stable.


Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Fiji N Extant Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name
Fiji Ogea

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland major resident
Altitude 0 - 82 m Occasional altitudinal limits  

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Climate change & severe weather Storms & flooding Timing Scope Severity Impact
Past, Likely to Return Whole (>90%) Negligible declines Past Impact
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases - Felis catus Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Species mortality
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases - Named species Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Species mortality
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Problematic native species/diseases - Circus approximans Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Species mortality
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Problematic native species/diseases - Mayrornis lessoni Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) No decline Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Hybridisation
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Problematic native species/diseases - Tyto alba Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Species mortality

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2023) Species factsheet: Mayrornis versicolor. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 29/01/2023. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2023) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 29/01/2023.