VU
Natewa Silktail Lamprolia klinesmithi



Justification

Justification of Red List Category
This newly-split species is classified as Vulnerable because it has a small population, and numbers are declining owing to losses of mature forest through continuing logging, plantation establishment and clearing for agriculture. 

Population justification
The population is estimated to number 3,000-6,000 pairs, equating to 6,000-12,000 mature individuals (J. S. Kretzschmar in litt. 2000).

Trend justification
Declines owing to losses of mature forest through continuing logging, plantation establishment and clearing for agriculture are not so severe as previously feared, because the rate of conversion of old-growth native forest to mahogany plantations has slowed significantly.

Distribution and population

This species is endemic to Fiji, being highly localised on Vanua Levu, where it is restricted to the Natewa Peninsula and does not occur in remaining apparently suitable habitat in the south-east (J. S. Kretzschmar in litt. 1998). In 1973 and 1975, it was readily found in groups of 2-5 (Heather 1977). In 1990, a total of 235 birds were located (Thorpe et al. 1990), and the total population was estimated at 3,000-6,000 pairs (J. S. Kretzschmar in litt. 2000).  

Ecology

It inhabits wet, mature rainforest, forest pockets, logged forest and (at lower densities) plantations close to intact forest (Thorpe et al. 1990, J. S. Kretzschmar in litt. 1998). It feeds on small arthropods and worms in the leaf-litter and insects in the lower canopy (Clunie 1984).

Threats

On Vanua Levu, the Natewa Peninsula is already extensively logged and habitat continues to be lost due to logging, clearance for agriculture and conversion of logged forest to exotic plantations (Thorpe et al. 1990). Exploitation of existing mature mahogany plantations is a further risk (J. S. Kretzschmar in litt. 1998). Although the rate of conversion of old-growth native forest to mahogany plantations has slowed significantly, with the rate of forest loss estimated to have returned to the underlying rate of 0.5-0.8 % per annum (Claasen 1991), it has nevertheless been estimated that c.100-130 km2 of the existing range could be lost within the next 10 years (J. S. Kretzschmar in litt. 2000)

Conservation actions

Conservation Actions Underway
The species is protected under Fijian law. There is a Community Conservation Area around the IBA.

Conservation Actions Proposed
Determine population size and trends, incorporating training of people from local communities in survey techniques. Advocate the cessation of mahogany planting. Raise awareness of the threat to the species within local communities (SPREP 2000)

Identification

12 cm. Small, striking, iridescent black monarch with conspicuous white rump. Deep velvet-black with metallic blue spangling on head, nape, throat and breast. Rump is silky white, extending over greater part of the tail. Long wings and short tail. Considerably larger and more strongly iridescent than L. victoriae. Voice Loud whistles, whistling trill and low, rasping squeaks. Hints Restless bird, with a swift, darting flight. Can be seen on the Natewa peninsula of Vanua Levu.

Acknowledgements

Text account compilers
Khwaja, N., O'Brien, A., Stattersfield, A., Temple, H. & Symes, A.

Contributors
Dutson, G., Kretzschmar, J. & Watling, D.


Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2019) Species factsheet: Lamprolia klinesmithi. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 19/07/2019. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2019) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 19/07/2019.