NT
Monteiro's Bush-shrike Malaconotus monteiri



Taxonomy

Taxonomic source(s)
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A., Fishpool, L.D.C., Boesman, P. and Kirwan, G.M. 2016. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 2: Passerines. Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- - -

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2019 Near Threatened C2a(i)
2016 Near Threatened B1ab(i,ii,iii,v)
2013 Near Threatened B1ab(i,ii,iii,v)
2012 Near Threatened B1ab(i,ii,iii,v)
2008 Data Deficient
2004 Data Deficient
2000 Data Deficient
1996 Endangered
1994 Endangered
1988 Threatened
Species attributes

Migratory status not a migrant Forest dependency Medium
Land mass type Average mass -
Distribution

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 43,500 medium
Number of locations -
Severely Fragmented -
Population and trend
Value Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals 1000-6700 poor suspected 0
Population trend Decreasing suspected -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) - - -
Number of subpopulations - - -
Percentage in largest subpopulation - - -
Generation length (yrs) 4.4 - - -

Population justification: The population size has not been quantified. In Angola, recent surveys found it to be relatively rare (Cáceres et al. 2015), while other studies found it more widespread and at least locally very common (Mills and Dean 2007, Mills 2010). A preliminary estimate can be derived based on the population estimate of the closely related Bokmakierie (Telophorus zeylonus), which occurs in a much larger global range, is described as ‘not uncommon’ in Angola and estimated to number 670-6,700 mature individuals (Dean 2000, BirdLife International 2019, see also eBird 2019). Unless more detailed information becomes available, we can tentatively assume Monteiro’s Bush-shrike to have a similar population size, however given that Monteiro’s Bush-shrike has been described as locally very common, it is considered unlikely to have a population smaller than 1,000 mature individuals. The population is therefore tentatively placed in the band 1,000-6,700 mature individuals.

Trend justification: Monteiro’s Bush-shrike is suspected to be in decline due to the ongoing destruction of its habitat. Considerable forest loss has occurred on the Angolan scarp already in the last decades. The major driver of forest loss is the conversion of forests into agricultural land by subsistence farmers. Canopy trees and forest undergrowth, but also overgrown coffee plantations and secondary growth have been removed to give way for cultivations of banana, manioc, sweet potatoes, cassava and maize (W. R. J. Dean in litt. 1999, F. Olmos in litt. 2011, M. Mills in litt. 2019).


Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Angola N Extant Yes
Cameroon N Presence Uncertain Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name
Angola Gabela
Cameroon Mount Kupe
Cameroon Mount Cameroon and Mokoko-Onge

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Artificial/Terrestrial Plantations suitable resident
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland suitable resident
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane major resident
Altitude 0 - 1450 m Occasional altitudinal limits  

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Agro-industry farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Shifting agriculture Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Small-holder farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2021) Species factsheet: Malaconotus monteiri. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 04/12/2021. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2021) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 04/12/2021.