NT
Malaita Myzomela Myzomela malaitae



Justification

Justification of Red List Category
This species is confined to a single small island where it is uncommon, it is therefore thought to have a moderately small population which is likely to be declining as a result of habitat degradation. It is therefore classified as Near Threatened.

Population justification
The population size of this species has not been quantified, but it is described as scarce or uncommon.

Trend justification
There are no data on population trends; however the species is suspected to be in slow decline owing to habitat degradation.

Distribution and population

Myzomela malaitae is endemic to Malaita in the Solomon Islands. It is a scarce inhabitant of forest, although it is more common in hills and mountains (P. Schofield in litt. 1994, G. Dutson pers. obs. 1997, Hornbuckle 1999a) . It is absent from secondary forest habitats in many areas (G. Dutson pers. obs. 1997) but may be more tolerant in other areas (P. Schofield in litt. 1994).

Ecology

It is found in forest and forest edge throughout Malaita, being more common in primary forest above 1,000 m (Dutson 2011).

Threats

Lowland and hill forest throughout Malaita is extensively being degraded through logging and clearance for gardens for a burgeoning human population. However, much of this species's population is above the altitudes threatened by logging or clearance.

Conservation actions

Conservation Actions Underway
None is known.

Conservation Actions Proposed
Monitor populations at a network of sites. Study its tolerance of degraded habitats. Ensure protection of primary forest at sites where it occurs.

Acknowledgements

Text account compilers
Dutson, G., Khwaja, N., Mahood, S., O'Brien, A., North, A.

Contributors
Schofield, P.


Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2019) Species factsheet: Myzomela malaitae. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 17/02/2019. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2019) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 17/02/2019.