LC
Lanceolated Warbler Locustella lanceolata



Justification

Justification of Red List Category
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (extent of occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The global population size is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Population justification
The European population is estimated at 30,000-60,000 pairs, which equates to 60,000-120,000 mature individuals (BirdLife International 2015). Europe forms <10% of the global range so a very preliminary estimate of the global population size is 600,000-1,200,000 mature individuals although further validation of this estimate is needed. National population estimates include: c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs and c.50-1,000 individuals on migration in China; c.100-10,000 breeding pairs and c.50-1,000 individuals on migration in Korea; c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs and c.50-1,000 individuals on migration in Japan and c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs and c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration in Russia (Brazil 2009).

Trend justification
The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence for any declines or substantial threats (del Hoyo et al. 2006). The population trend in Europe is unknown (BirdLife International 2015).

Distribution and population

Ecology

Within its European range, the species inhabits damp valleys, especially by streams and on lake and marsh edges, open meadows with scattered bushes, damp woodland clearings and forest-edge scrub. It is also found in clearings in open birch (Betula) and larch (Larix) forest with patches of scrub and scattered bushes [Pearson 2006]). Egg-laying begins in mid-June and clutches are three to five eggs (Snow and Perrins 1998). The nest is a deep thick-walled cup of dry grass, leaves and moss, which is lined with finer grass. It is typically built in a shallow hollow beneath a grass clump and hidden by grasses and leaves. The diet is mainly adult and larval insects, especially beetles (Coleoptera) and ants (Hymenoptera) but it also takes spiders (Araneae) and seeds. The species is a long distance migrant, wintering in south-east Asia (Pearson 2006).

Threats

There are not thought to be any current significant threats to this species (Pearson 2006).

Conservation actions

Conservation Actions Underway
CMS Appendix II. Bern Convention Appendix II. There are currently no known conservation measures in place for this species in its European range.

Conservation Actions Proposed
No conservation measures are currently needed for this species in its European range.

Acknowledgements

Text account compilers
Ekstrom, J., Symes, A., Butchart, S., Ashpole, J


Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2019) Species factsheet: Locustella lanceolata. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 17/02/2019. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2019) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 17/02/2019.