LC
Hooded Gnateater Conopophaga roberti



Justification

Justification of Red List Category
This species has a very large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Population justification
The global population size has not been quantified, but this species is described as 'rare to uncommon' (Stotz et al. 1996).

Trend justification
Population trends have not been quantified, although extensive deforestation east of the rio Tocantins, including within protected areas (M. and P. Isler in litt. 1999, Stotz et al. 1996), and understorey degradation may be adversely affecting this poorly known species.

Distribution and population

This species occurs east of the rio Tocantins in north Brazil, in Pará, Ceará (where it may persist only in Gorupi reserve), Maranhão and Piauí.

Ecology

The species inhabits lowland humid forest and is very common in mature second growth in east Pará (Ridgely and Tudor 1994).

Threats

Extensive deforestation east of the rio Tocantins, including within protected areas (Stotz et al. 1996, M. and P. Isler in litt. 1999), and understorey degradation may be adversely affecting this poorly known species. However, it persists in small woodlots east of São Luís, Maranhão, but it presumably cannot disperse between isolated woodlots and such fragmentation probably has long-term consequences (Collar and Andrew 1988).

Acknowledgements

Text account compilers
Ekstrom, J., Butchart, S., Harding, M., Fisher, S.


Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2019) Species factsheet: Conopophaga roberti. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 21/09/2019. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2019) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 21/09/2019.