VU
Glossy Black-cockatoo Calyptorhynchus lathami



Taxonomy

Taxonomic source(s)
Christidis, L. and Boles, W.E. 2008. Systematics and Taxonomy of Australian Birds. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood, Australia.
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A. and Fishpool, L.D.C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 1: Non-passerines. Lynx Edicions BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- - A2bc+3c+4bc

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2022 Vulnerable A2bc+3c+4bc
2016 Least Concern
2012 Least Concern
2009 Least Concern
2008 Least Concern
2004 Least Concern
2000 Lower Risk/Least Concern
1996 Vulnerable
1994 Vulnerable
1988 Lower Risk/Least Concern
Species attributes

Migratory status not a migrant Forest dependency High
Land mass type Land-mass type - Australia
Average mass 437 g
Distribution

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 2,010,000 medium
Number of locations -
Severely Fragmented -
Population and trend
Value Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals 7000-14000 poor suspected 2020
Population trend Decreasing inferred -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) 30-40 - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) 30-40 - - -
Number of subpopulations 3 - - -
Percentage in largest subpopulation 1-89 - - -
Generation length (yrs) 11.9 - - -

Population justification: Using density and occupancy estimates, the population sizes of C. l. lathami and C. l. halmaturinus have been estimated at 6,000-10,500 (best estimate 7,500) and 230-290 (best estimate 250) mature individuals respectively. The population of C. l. erebus, however, has not been estimated. Based on areas of suitable habitat, it is suspected to number c.2,000 mature individuals, however there is substantial uncertainty with this. Combining these and account for these uncertainties, the total population is suspected to number 7,000-14,000 mature individuals.

Trend justification:

Data are inconsistent (both in their trend and reliability) across the three subspecies.

Trend data for C. l. lathami up to 2019 indicate rapid declines over the past three generations. Reporting rates from 500-m radius area searches across their range, arguably the most reliable of the available survey methods for the species, declined by 59% from 1999–2019, equivalent to a decline of 79% in three generations. However, there was no significant change in reporting rates between 1977–1981 and 1998–2001 either nationally (Barrett et al. 2002), or in New South Wales (Barrett et al. 2007) and the 2-ha 20-min survey data from 1999–2019 (BirdLife Australia 2020) was too variable to provide a reliable trend. Similarly, the reporting rates derived from an annual Glossy Black-Cockatoo birding day event held since 2010 across south-eastern Queensland and far north-eastern New South Wales revealed that these are stable with no significant decline over from 2010–2017 (Cameron et al. 2021). 

The population size and trend of C. l. erebus has not been estimated. Although the population has expanded its range to the Wet Tropics in the past 20 years (Garnett et al. 1999), high quality habitat at Eungella was badly burned in recent fires. Overall, the population of this taxon is believed to be comparatively small and probably stable (S. Garnett in litt. 2021).

The population of C. l. halmaturinus is tiny, hence although it has increased in the last three generations and effective management is expected to maintain the trajectory, its trend is unlikely to disrupt or affect the global trend.

Combining these analyses, Garnett & Baker (2021) inferred that the global rate of decline of this species is >30% over the past three generations and this is accepted here. Given the ongoing nature of the threats this rate is also suspected to continue in the future.


Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Australia N Extant Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Dry major resident
Altitude 0 - 1410 m Occasional altitudinal limits  

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Agro-industry farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Indirect ecosystem effects, Ecosystem degradation
Agriculture & aquaculture Livestock farming & ranching - Agro-industry grazing, ranching or farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Indirect ecosystem effects, Ecosystem degradation
Climate change & severe weather Droughts Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Indirect ecosystem effects, Ecosystem degradation
Climate change & severe weather Habitat shifting & alteration Timing Scope Severity Impact
Future Whole (>90%) Unknown Unknown
Stresses
Indirect ecosystem effects, Ecosystem degradation
Climate change & severe weather Temperature extremes Timing Scope Severity Impact
Future Whole (>90%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Species mortality
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases - Apis mellifera Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Unknown Unknown Unknown
Stresses
Competition
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases - Capra hircus Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Unknown Negligible declines Unknown
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases - Named species Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Unknown Negligible declines Unknown
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases - Oryctolagus cuniculus Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Unknown Negligible declines Unknown
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Problematic native species/diseases - Named species Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Unknown Negligible declines Unknown
Stresses
Competition
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Problematic native species/diseases - Unspecified species Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Unknown Unknown Unknown
Stresses
Species mortality
Natural system modifications Fire & fire suppression - Increase in fire frequency/intensity Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Rapid Declines Medium Impact: 7
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Species mortality
Residential & commercial development Housing & urban areas Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Unknown Negligible declines Unknown
Stresses
Indirect ecosystem effects, Ecosystem degradation

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2023) Species factsheet: Calyptorhynchus lathami. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 03/02/2023. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2023) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 03/02/2023.