EN
Gabela Bush-shrike Laniarius amboimensis



Taxonomy

Taxonomic source(s)
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A., Fishpool, L.D.C., Boesman, P. and Kirwan, G.M. 2016. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 2: Passerines. Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- C2a(i) C2a(i)

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2020 Endangered C2a(i)
2016 Endangered C2a(i)
2013 Endangered C2a(i)
2012 Endangered C2a(i)
2008 Endangered B1a+b(i,ii,iii,v); C2a(i)
2004 Endangered
2000 Endangered
1996 Endangered
1994 Endangered
1988 Lower Risk/Least Concern
Species attributes

Migratory status not a migrant Forest dependency High
Land mass type Land-mass type - continent
Average mass -
Extent of occurrence (EOO)

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 5,009 medium
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 3,612
Number of locations -
Fragmentation -
Population and trend
Estimate Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals 1000-2499 poor estimated 2020
Population trend Decreasing poor inferred -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) - - -
Number of subpopulations 2-100 - - -
Largest subpopulations - - -

Population justification: The population size for this species has not been directly quantified, but it is safe to estimate, given the limited sightings by researchers actively looking for the bird, that there are fewer than 1,000 pairs (M. Mills in litt. 2020) in the global population. M. Mills (in litt. 2020) reports not sighting this species in Kumbira (the best known site for this species) since 2017, and that this is not atypical across the whole of the species range. Extensive surveys along the central escarpment in 2018-2019 found three pairs over ten days of searching (M. Mills in litt. 2020). Only one pair is now known at Bango, where previously there had been several (M. Mills. in litt. 2020). It is also reported by P. Vaz Pinto (in litt. 2020) that the species is now rarely observed in Kumbira, and that only two pairs were located after several weeks of searching in 2019. Further surveys elsewhere in the range only reported one additional pair. It is also likely that over the past several years, birdwatchers have observed no more than 10 pairs (P. Vaz Pinto in litt. 2020). Additionally, L Fishpool (in litt. 2020) only observed one pair of Gabela Bush-shrike after three days actively searching for the bird in places it had been previously recorded, and using playback recordings in the hope of generating a response. Therefore, the population size is tentatively placed here in the 1,000 - 2,499 band.

Trend justification: The population is inferred to be in decline owing to the loss and degradation of the species's forest habitat through clearance and modification for cultivation (Mills, in litt. 2020; Vaz Pinto, in litt. 2020; Fishpool, in litt. 2020). The likely rate of decline, however, has not been estimated.


Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Angola N Extant Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name
Angola Camabatela
Angola Gabela

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Artificial/Terrestrial Plantations suitable resident
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane major resident
Altitude 730 - 1100 m Occasional altitudinal limits  

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Agro-industry farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Future Whole (>90%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Shifting agriculture Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Small-holder farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Whole (>90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 7
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Biological resource use Logging & wood harvesting - Unintentional effects: (subsistence/small scale) [harvest] Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation
Climate change & severe weather Habitat shifting & alteration Timing Scope Severity Impact
Future Whole (>90%) Unknown Unknown
Stresses
Indirect ecosystem effects, Ecosystem degradation
Transportation & service corridors Roads & railroads Timing Scope Severity Impact
Future Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2021) Species factsheet: Laniarius amboimensis. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 07/03/2021. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2021) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 07/03/2021.