VU
Coral-billed Ground-cuckoo Carpococcyx renauldi



Taxonomy

Taxonomic source(s)
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A. and Fishpool, L.D.C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 1: Non-passerines. Lynx Edicions BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- - A2cd+3cd+4cd

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2018 Vulnerable A2cd+3cd+4cd
2016 Least Concern
2012 Least Concern
2009 Least Concern
2008 Least Concern
2004 Least Concern
2000 Lower Risk/Least Concern
1994 Lower Risk/Near Threatened
1988 Near Threatened
Species attributes

Migratory status not a migrant Forest dependency Medium
Land mass type Average mass -
Extent of occurrence (EOO)

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 816,000
Number of locations -
Fragmentation -
Population and trend
Estimate Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals unknown not applicable not applicable 0
Population trend Decreasing suspected -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) 30-49 - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) 30-49 - - -
Number of subpopulations - - -
Largest subpopulations - - -
Generation length (yrs) 4.2 - - -

Population justification: The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is reported to be uncommon (del Hoyo et al. 1997).

Trend justification: The species is suspected to be in decline owing to increasing hunting pressure and habitat loss. Although its secretive ground-dwelling lifestyle makes it difficult to find and it may be under-recorded, the increasing threat from hunters using cable-snaring suggests likely that the species is genuinely very rare and decreasing. The rate of decline has not been estimated and likely differs between countries. Therefore, it is precautionarily placed in the band 30-49% over three generations (13 years).

While the species is still abundant in protected areas in Cambodia (D.L. Yong and S. Mahood in litt. 2018), in the northern part of the country it is suspected to be rare and declining (S. Mahood in litt. 2016). In the Cardamom Mountains in the south of the country, the amount of habitat remains large and must have held a large population. However, the level of snaring is increasing in the lower areas of the Cardamoms, and recent camera-trap surveys failed to detect the species (Gray et al. 2017). Yet, it is likely that larger populations may remain in the more remote and less accessible areas of the mountains (T. Gray in litt. 2018). In Laos and Vietnam, the species used to be abundant in the 1990s (J.W. Duckworth in litt. 2018). Following the tremendous increase in industrial drift-fence cable snaring since then, it has been suggested that rates of decline over the past three generations in those countries may have exceeded 80% (J. W. Duckworth in litt. 2016, 2018).

The population in Thailand is assumed to be large and likely stable. It continues to be regularly recorded within Khao Yai National Park in the south of the country, but recent records from outside protected areas are sparse. The extent of cable-snaring in Thailand is significantly lower than in the other three countries (J. W. Duckworth in litt. 2018).



Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Cambodia N Extant Yes
Laos N Extant Yes
Thailand N Extant Yes
Vietnam N Extant Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name
Cambodia Phnom Aural
Cambodia Phnom Bokor
Cambodia Phnom Samkos
Laos Dong Khanthung
Laos Eastern Bolikhamxay Mountains
Laos Hin Namno
Laos Nakai Plateau
Laos Nakai-Nam Theun

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland suitable resident
Shrubland Subtropical/Tropical Dry suitable resident
Shrubland Subtropical/Tropical Moist suitable resident
Altitude 0 - 900 m Occasional altitudinal limits (max) 1500 m

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Small-holder farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Species disturbance, Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Biological resource use Hunting & trapping terrestrial animals - Intentional use (species is the target) Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Species mortality
Biological resource use Hunting & trapping terrestrial animals - Unintentional effects (species is not the target) Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Species mortality
Biological resource use Logging & wood harvesting - Unintentional effects: (subsistence/small scale) [harvest] Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Natural system modifications Other ecosystem modifications Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Species disturbance

Utilisation
Purpose Primary form used Life stage used Source Scale Level Timing
Food (human) Whole Adults and juveniles Wild Non-trivial Recent
Food - human - - Non-trivial Recent
Pets Whole Adults and juveniles Wild Non-trivial Recent
Pets Whole Adults and juveniles Wild International Non-trivial Recent
Pets/display animals, horticulture - - International Non-trivial Recent

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2019) Species factsheet: Carpococcyx renauldi. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 15/09/2019. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2019) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 15/09/2019.