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Chestnut-breasted Whiteface Aphelocephala pectoralis



Taxonomy

Taxonomic source(s)
Christidis, L. and Boles, W.E. 2008. Systematics and Taxonomy of Australian Birds. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood, Australia.
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A., Fishpool, L.D.C., Boesman, P. and Kirwan, G.M. 2016. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 2: Passerines. Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- - -

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2022 Near Threatened A2b; B2b(ii,iii,v)
2016 Near Threatened C2a(ii)
2012 Near Threatened C2a(ii)
2008 Near Threatened C2a(ii)
2004 Near Threatened
2000 Lower Risk/Near Threatened
1996 Vulnerable
1994 Vulnerable
1988 Threatened
Species attributes

Migratory status not a migrant Forest dependency Does not normally occur in forest
Land mass type Land-mass type - Australia
Average mass -
Distribution

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 244,000 medium
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 294
Number of locations -
Severely Fragmented -
Population and trend
Value Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals 1500-6000, 3000 poor suspected 2020
Population trend Decreasing poor inferred -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) - - -
Number of subpopulations 2 - - -
Percentage in largest subpopulation 1-89 - - -

Population justification: There have been no attempts to estimate the population size of Chestnut-breasted Whitefaces since 1990 when the population was estimated at <1,500 mature individuals between Lyndhurst and the Birdsville Track, <2,000 near Oodnadatta and <2,500 between Coober Pedy and Port Augusta (Pedler 1991, 1992) with no evidence of declines detected in a repeat survey in 1999 or part survey in 2007 (Pedler et al. 2007). However, there have been no records near Lyndhurst since July 2016 despite searching and no confirmed records along the Birdsville track for several decades. The population is therefore suspected to be in the range 1,500-6,000 individuals with a best estimate of 3,000 (Pedler and Garnett 2021).

Trend justification: Since the 1990 population estimate, there were no evidence of declines detected in a repeat survey in 1999 or part survey in 2007 (Pedler et al. 2007). In a good season, it occurred at densities of about 0.07 birds/ha at Lyndhurst (Pedler 1992) with c.70 in 1991, >27 in 1999 and >30 in 2007. Although numbers varied with rainfall (Pedler et al. 2007), they could always be found. However, there have been no records near Lyndhurst since July 2016 despite searching and no confirmed records along the Birdsville track for several decades, suggesting an overall decline approaching 30%. The current absence of records, despite searching, coincides with rainfall over the last four years in the lowest decile of four years rainfall totals (Bureau of Meteorology 2020).


Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Australia N Extant Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name
Australia Mount Lyndhurst
Australia Bulgunnia
Australia Granite Downs

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Grassland Subtropical/Tropical Dry major resident
Rocky areas (eg. inland cliffs, mountain peaks) major resident
Shrubland Subtropical/Tropical Dry major resident
Altitude 0 - 380 m Occasional altitudinal limits  

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Agriculture & aquaculture Livestock farming & ranching - Agro-industry grazing, ranching or farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Climate change & severe weather Droughts Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Whole (>90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 7
Stresses
Indirect ecosystem effects, Ecosystem degradation
Climate change & severe weather Temperature extremes Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Whole (>90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 7
Stresses
Indirect ecosystem effects, Ecosystem degradation
Energy production & mining Mining & quarrying Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases - Capra hircus Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases - Felis catus Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Unknown Negligible declines Unknown
Stresses
Species mortality
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases - Oryctolagus cuniculus Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases - Vulpes vulpes Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Unknown Negligible declines Unknown
Stresses
Species mortality
Natural system modifications Fire & fire suppression - Increase in fire frequency/intensity Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2022) Species factsheet: Aphelocephala pectoralis. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 09/12/2022. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2022) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 09/12/2022.