NT
Chestnut-bellied Hummingbird Amazilia castaneiventris



Taxonomy

Taxonomic source(s)
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A. and Fishpool, L.D.C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 1: Non-passerines. Lynx Edicions BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.
SACC. 2005 and updates. A classification of the bird species of South America. Available at: #http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.htm#.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- - -

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2019 Near Threatened B1ab(iii,v)+2ab(iii,v)
2016 Endangered B1ab(iii)
2012 Endangered B1ab(iii)
2009 Endangered B1a+b(iii)
2008 Critically Endangered
2004 Critically Endangered
2000 Critically Endangered
1996 Endangered
1994 Endangered
1988 Threatened
Species attributes

Migratory status altitudinal migrant Forest dependency Medium
Land mass type Land-mass type - continent
Average mass -
Extent of occurrence (EOO)

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 11,500 medium
Number of locations 11-100 -
Fragmentation -
Population and trend
Estimate Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals 10000-19999 medium estimated 2019
Population trend Decreasing poor suspected -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) - - -
Number of subpopulations 2 - - -
Largest subpopulations 1-89 - - -
Generation length (yrs) 3.4 - - -

Population justification: This species has been recorded at a number of new sites in recent years. While still apparently rare in some areas and nowhere abundant, there is a comparatively large area of potentially suitable habitat. Based on the area of the species’s mapped range (4,949km2), a range of recorded population densities (10, 33, 60, 140 and 210 individuals/km2; Cortes-Herrera 2006, D. C. Sabogal in litt. 2009, Peñuela and Archila 2010, Renjifo et al. 2016), and assuming that 11-22% of the range is occupied, the species’s population size is estimated to fall within the range 18,600 – 66,300 individuals, roughly equivalent to 12,400 – 44,200 mature individuals. The national Red List of Colombia estimated the population size at 24,120 individuals (Renjifo et al. 2016), roughly equivalent to 16,080 mature individuals. The population size is therefore here placed in the band 10,000-19,999 mature individuals. However, a recent analysis based on land cover data and a population density model estimated the population size at 117,733 mature individuals (Santini et al. 2019); if this number is confirmed the population size estimate will need to be adjusted accordingly. The species is thought to form at least two subpopulations, since the record in the Serranía de San Lucas (Donegan 2012) is quite distant from the other recent records.

Trend justification: The population trend has not been assessed directly, and it is unclear whether the population size and availability of habitat are declining. A recent analysis of forest loss data from 2000-2012 indicated that forest was lost within the species’s range at a rate equivalent to 1% across three generations (Tracewski et al. 2016). However, this species inhabits forest edges and shrubland, so forest loss may not be a reliable indicator of population change or habitat quality for this species. An analysis of area of habitat and population size based on modelled population densities and remote-sensed land cover data estimated that the species’s area of habitat and population has slightly increased over three generations (Santini et al. 2019). The national Red List of Colombia also estimated an increase in available habitat between 2001 and 2011 (Renjifo et al. 2016). Nevertheless, there may be some habitat degradation, for example from logging, and the population may be impacted by hunting as well as habitat degradation (Renjifo et al. 2016). Therefore, unless new information on the population trend becomes available, the species is precautionarily retained as in decline.


Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Colombia N Extant Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name
Colombia Bosques Secos del Valle del Río Chicamocha
Colombia Soatá

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Artificial/Terrestrial Pastureland suitable resident
Artificial/Terrestrial Plantations suitable resident
Artificial/Terrestrial Rural Gardens suitable resident
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland suitable resident
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane suitable resident
Shrubland Subtropical/Tropical Moist suitable resident
Altitude 340 - 2200 m Occasional altitudinal limits (min) 120 m

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Agro-industry farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Small-holder farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Agriculture & aquaculture Livestock farming & ranching - Agro-industry grazing, ranching or farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Biological resource use Hunting & trapping terrestrial animals - Intentional use (species is the target) Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Species mortality
Biological resource use Logging & wood harvesting - Unintentional effects: (subsistence/small scale) [harvest] Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation
Energy production & mining Mining & quarrying Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Residential & commercial development Housing & urban areas Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Transportation & service corridors Roads & railroads Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion

Utilisation
Purpose Primary form used Life stage used Source Scale Level Timing
Pets/display animals, horticulture - - International Non-trivial Recent

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2020) Species factsheet: Amazilia castaneiventris. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 28/11/2020. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2020) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 28/11/2020.