VU
Cheer Pheasant Catreus wallichii



Taxonomy

Taxonomic note
C. wallichii (del Hoyo and Collar 2014) was previously listed as C. wallichi.

Taxonomic source(s)
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A. and Fishpool, L.D.C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 1: Non-passerines. Lynx Edicions BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- - C2a(i)

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2016 Vulnerable C2a(i)
2013 Vulnerable C2a(i)
2012 Vulnerable C2a(i)
2008 Vulnerable C2a(i)
2004 Vulnerable
2000 Vulnerable
1996 Vulnerable
1994 Vulnerable
1988 Threatened
Species attributes

Migratory status not a migrant Forest dependency Low
Land mass type Land-mass type - continent
Average mass -
Extent of occurrence (EOO)

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 259,000 medium
Number of locations 11-100 -
Fragmentation -
Population and trend
Estimate Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals 2000-2700 medium estimated 2010
Population trend Decreasing poor suspected -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) 10-19 - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) 10-19 - - -
Number of subpopulations 2-100 - - -
Largest subpopulations 1-89 - - -
Generation length (yrs) 5 - - -

Population justification: The population was formerly estimated to number 4,000-6,000 individuals, roughly equivalent to 2,700-4,000 mature individuals (R. Kaul in litt. 2007). Subsequent surveys of previously-studied sites in Himachal Pradesh showed evidence of significant declines and even disappearance from some sites, suggesting that a revised population estimate could be 3,000–4,000 individuals (R. Kalsi pers. comm., in Rahmani 2012), roughly equating to 2,000-2,700 mature individuals.  More recent regional estimates suggest that the total population may be considerably larger: while no more than 1,500 individuals are estimated to survive in Nepal, in Pakistan a significant breeding population persists in Jhelum valley which could be as large as c.2,490 pairs (Awan et al. 2014), and additional numbers in the Kahuta valley may increase the total further. The global total may therefore prove to be larger but the current estimate of 2,000-2,700 mature individuals is maintained until larger numbers can be confirmed.

Trend justification: This species appears to be particularly vulnerable to hunting pressure as it has a strong association with human settlements, relying on low-level anthropogenic disturbance to maintain its preferred habitat. Hunting pressure and habitat fragmentation are suspected to be causing a moderate global decline.


Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
India N Extant Yes
Nepal N Extant Yes
Pakistan N Extant Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name
India Askot Wildlife Sanctuary and Goriganga Basin
India Bandli Wildlife Sanctuary
India Binog Sanctuary - Bhadraj - Jharipani
India Chail Wildlife Sanctuary
India Dhauludhar Wildlife Sanctuary and McLeod Gunj
India Gamgul Siahbehi Wildlife Sanctuary
India Gangotri National Park
India Govind National Park and Wildlife Sanctuary, Sandra, Kotinad and Singtur ranges (Tons forest division)
India Great Himalayan National Park
India Kais Wildlife Sanctuary
India Kalatop Khajjiar Wildlife Sanctuary
India Kanawar Wildlife Sanctuary
India Kedarnath Musk Deer Sanctuary and surrounding Reserve Forests
India Khirganga National Park
India Kugti Wildlife Sanctuary
India Limbar Valley Wildlife Sanctuary
India Majathal Wildlife Sanctuary
India Naina Devi Himalayan Bird Conservation Reserve
India Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve
India Rupi Bhaba Wildlife Sanctuary
India Shikari Devi Wildlife Sanctuary
India Shimla Water Catchment Wildlife Sanctuary
India Talra Wildlife Sanctuary
India Tirthan Wildlife Sanctuary
India Upper Pindar Catchment in East Almora Forest Division
Nepal Annapurna Conservation Area
Nepal Dhorpatan Hunting Reserve
Nepal Rara National Park
Pakistan Machiara National Park
Pakistan Salkala Wildlife Sanctuary

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Swamp suitable resident
Grassland Temperate suitable resident
Shrubland Temperate major resident
Altitude 1445 - 3050 m Occasional altitudinal limits (min) 950 m

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Agro-industry farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Small-holder farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Agriculture & aquaculture Livestock farming & ranching - Agro-industry grazing, ranching or farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Agriculture & aquaculture Livestock farming & ranching - Small-holder grazing, ranching or farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Agriculture & aquaculture Wood & pulp plantations - Scale Unknown/Unrecorded Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Biological resource use Hunting & trapping terrestrial animals - Intentional use (species is the target) Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Species mortality
Biological resource use Logging & wood harvesting - Unintentional effects: (subsistence/small scale) [harvest] Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Human intrusions & disturbance Work & other activities Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Species disturbance
Natural system modifications Dams & water management/use - Large dams Timing Scope Severity Impact
Future Minority (<50%) Rapid Declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem conversion
Natural system modifications Fire & fire suppression - Increase in fire frequency/intensity Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Rapid Declines Medium Impact: 7
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion

Utilisation
Purpose Primary form used Life stage used Source Scale Level Timing
Food - human - - Non-trivial Recent
Pets/display animals, horticulture - - International Non-trivial Recent

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2019) Species factsheet: Catreus wallichii. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 12/12/2019. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2019) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 12/12/2019.