DD
Black-headed Rufous-warbler Bathmocercus cerviniventris



Taxonomy

Taxonomic source(s)
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A., Fishpool, L.D.C., Boesman, P. and Kirwan, G.M. 2016. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 2: Passerines. Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- - -

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2018 Data Deficient
2016 Near Threatened A2c+3c+4c
2012 Near Threatened A2c+3c+4c
2008 Near Threatened A2c; A3c; A4c
2004 Near Threatened
2000 Lower Risk/Near Threatened
1996 Vulnerable
1994 Vulnerable
1988 Near Threatened
Species attributes

Migratory status not a migrant Forest dependency Medium
Land mass type Land-mass type - continent
Average mass -
Extent of occurrence (EOO)

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 154,000 medium
Number of locations -
Fragmentation -
Population and trend
Estimate Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals unknown not applicable not applicable 0
Population trend Decreasing suspected -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) - - -
Number of subpopulations - - -
Largest subpopulations 100 - - -

Population justification: The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as locally common (del Hoyo et al. 2006). Gatter (1997) estimated that Liberia could contain 60,000 pairs, but given the recent evidence of the loss of occupied habitat, and its disappearance from areas where it had been thought to be locally common, it is likely that the global population size is much smaller than this, or the previous estimates from Gatter (1997) had been too high. In effect the population size is essentially unknown.

Trend justification: The population is suspected to be declining owing to ongoing habitat destruction. Tracewski et al. (2016) estimated the rate of forest loss within the species's range at c.0.5% per year between 2000 and 2012, which would roughly equate to c.4.9% over 10 years. However, this included large areas where the species is not known to occur. Phalan et al. (2013) failed to locate the species at all during surveys of Grand Gedeh County, even when using playback, despite Gatter (1997) saying that there could be as many as 4 males per 200m at Zwedru. Therefore, while it is likely appropriate to consider this species to be in decline, it is not possible to quantify the rate of decline, and it could fall anywhere between a slow decline and potentially an extremely rapid one.


Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Côte d'Ivoire N Extant Yes
Ghana N Possibly Extinct Yes
Guinea N Extant Yes
Liberia N Extant Yes
Sierra Leone N Extant Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name
Côte d'Ivoire Lamto Ecological Research Station
Côte d'Ivoire Marahoue National Park
Côte d'Ivoire Mount Nimba Strict Nature Reserve
Côte d'Ivoire Parc National de Taï et Réserve de faune du N'Zo
Guinea Massif du Ziama
Liberia Grebo
Liberia Nimba mountains
Liberia Sapo
Liberia Wologizi mountains
Liberia Wonegizi mountains
Liberia Zwedru
Sierra Leone Kangari Hills Non-hunting Forest Reserve
Sierra Leone Tingi Hills Non-hunting Forest Reserve

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland suitable resident
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane major resident
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Swamp major resident
Altitude   Occasional altitudinal limits  

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Small-holder farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Biological resource use Logging & wood harvesting - Unintentional effects: (large scale) [harvest] Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Energy production & mining Mining & quarrying Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Rapid Declines Medium Impact: 6
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2019) Species factsheet: Bathmocercus cerviniventris. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 19/06/2019. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2019) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 19/06/2019.