LC
Antarctic Petrel Thalassoica antarctica



Justification

Justification of Red List Category
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is extremely large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Population justification
Brooke (2004) estimated the global population to number between 10,000,000 and 20,000,000 individuals.

Trend justification
There is no evidence of population changes (Brooke 2004).

Distribution and population

This species is found along the whole Antarctic coastline, also breeding on nearby islands (del Hoyo et al. 1992).

Ecology

The Antarctic Petrel nests on snow-free cliffs and rock faces. Nesting sites are mostly coastal or on offshore islands, but it has been found to nest up to 250 km inland. The diet of this species is comprised mostly of krill, but also fish and squid. Prey is obtained mostly by surface-seizing but diving from the air and surface is also seen (del Hoyo et al. 1992).

Threats

At present there are no factors thought to pose a genuine threat to this species.

Acknowledgements

Text account compilers
Butchart, S., Calvert, R., Ekstrom, J., Fjagesund, T., Hermes, C., Martin, R., Newton, P., Stuart, A.


Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2019) Species factsheet: Thalassoica antarctica. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 16/02/2019. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2019) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 16/02/2019.