LC
Amur Falcon Falco amurensis



Taxonomy

Taxonomic source(s)
AERC TAC. 2003. AERC TAC Checklist of bird taxa occurring in Western Palearctic region, 15th Draft. Available at: #http://www.aerc.eu/DOCS/Bird_taxa_of _the_WP15.xls#.
del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A. and Fishpool, L.D.C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 1: Non-passerines. Lynx Edicions BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN Red list criteria met and history
Red List criteria met
Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable
- - -

Red List history
Year Category Criteria
2021 Least Concern
2016 Least Concern
2012 Least Concern
2009 Least Concern
2008 Least Concern
2004 Least Concern
2000 Lower Risk/Least Concern
1994 Lower Risk/Least Concern
1988 Lower Risk/Least Concern
Species attributes

Migratory status full migrant Forest dependency Low
Land mass type Average mass -
Distribution

Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 3,450,000
Extent of Occurrence non-breeding (km2) 7,290,000
Number of locations -
Severely Fragmented -
Population and trend
Value Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals 200000-667000 poor suspected 2009
Population trend Stable suspected -
Decline (3 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (5 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/1 generation past) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation future) - - -
Decline (10 years/3 generation past and future) - - -
Number of subpopulations - - -
Percentage in largest subpopulation - - -
Generation length (yrs) 3.53 - - -

Population justification: The global population is estimated to number > c.1,000,000 individuals (Ferguson-Lees et al. 2001), while national population estimates include: c.100-10,000 breeding pairs and c.50-1,000 individuals on migration in China; c.100-10,000 breeding pairs and < c.50 individuals on migration in Korea; < c.50 individuals on migration in Japan and c.100-10,000 breeding pairs and c.50-1,000 individuals on migration in Russia (Brazil 2009). A national census in South Africa recorded 111,291 individuals in 2009 (Symes and Woodborne 2010), which led to a global population estimate of 300,000-500,000 individuals (A. van Zyl, cited in Global Raptor Information Network 2015). This suggests that either a large proportion of the population overwinters further north or that the global population size is considerably smaller than the maximum estimate of 1,000,000 individuals (Symes and Woodborne 2010). It is placed in the band 300,000-1,000,000 individuals, roughly equating to 200,000-667,000 mature individuals.

Trend justification: The population is suspected to historically have undergone rapid declines due to persecution along its migration route. However, thanks to a successful community outreach project in Nagaland, India, there have been no reports of hunting in the area since 2013. The population is now suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence for any declines or substantial threats.


Country/territory distribution
Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Resident Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Angola N Extant Yes
Bangladesh N Extant Yes
Bhutan N Extant Yes
Botswana N Extant Yes
Burundi N Extant Yes
China (mainland) N Extant Yes Yes
Congo, The Democratic Republic of the V Extant
Eswatini N Extant Yes
Ethiopia N Extant Yes
Hong Kong (China) V Extant Yes
India N Extant Yes
Italy V Extant
Japan V Extant
Kenya N Extant Yes
Laos N Extant Yes
Lesotho N Extant Yes
Malawi N Extant Yes
Maldives N Extant Yes
Mongolia N Extant Yes
Mozambique N Extant Yes Yes
Myanmar N Extant Yes
Namibia N Extant Yes
Nepal N Extant Yes
North Korea N Extant Yes Yes
Northern Mariana Islands (to USA) V Extant
Oman N Extant Yes
Pakistan V Extant Yes
Qatar V Extant Yes
Russia N Extant Yes
Russia (Asian) N Extant Yes
Rwanda N Extant Yes
Saudi Arabia V Extant Yes
Seychelles V Extant
Somalia N Extant Yes
South Africa N Extant Yes
South Korea N Extant Yes
Sri Lanka N Extant Yes
St Helena (to UK) V Extant
Tanzania N Extant Yes
Thailand N Extant Yes
Uganda N Extant Yes
United Arab Emirates V Extant Yes
Vietnam N Extant Yes
Yemen N Extant Yes
Zambia N Extant Yes
Zimbabwe N Extant Yes

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA)
Country/Territory IBA Name
Botswana Okavango Delta
India Habang
Kenya Boni and Dodori National Reserves
India Doyang Reservoir and Pangti Forest
India Krungming Reserve Forest, Khorongma & Kopili-Umrangsu Reservoirs
India Dailong Rongku Forest

Habitats & altitude
Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Artificial/Terrestrial Arable Land suitable non-breeding
Artificial/Terrestrial Plantations suitable non-breeding
Forest Temperate suitable breeding
Grassland Subtropical/Tropical Dry suitable non-breeding
Grassland Temperate suitable breeding
Savanna Dry suitable non-breeding
Wetlands (inland) Bogs, Marshes, Swamps, Fens, Peatlands suitable breeding
Altitude   Occasional altitudinal limits (max) 4420 m

Threats & impact
Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops - Shifting agriculture Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Agriculture & aquaculture Livestock farming & ranching - Small-holder grazing, ranching or farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation
Biological resource use Hunting & trapping terrestrial animals - Intentional use (species is the target) Timing Scope Severity Impact
Past, Likely to Return Majority (50-90%) Rapid Declines Past Impact
Stresses
Species mortality
Biological resource use Logging & wood harvesting - Unintentional effects: (large scale) [harvest] Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Energy production & mining Mining & quarrying Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Natural system modifications Other ecosystem modifications Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation

Utilisation
Purpose Primary form used Life stage used Source Scale Level Timing
Food - human - - Non-trivial Recent
Pets/display animals, horticulture - - International Non-trivial Recent

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2022) Species factsheet: Falco amurensis. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 29/05/2022. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2022) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 29/05/2022.