BS012
Driggs Hill to Mars Bay


Country/territory: Bahamas

IBA Criteria met: A1, A2, A4i (2013)
For more information about IBA criteria please click here

Area: 10,059 ha

Protection status:

Bahamas National Trust

Site description
This site is located on South Andros Island, and spans a distance of about 30 miles of road which runs along the east coast. Several known blue holes are found in this site including Rat Bat Lake and Twins located north of Congo Town airport. Nine Tasks Blue Hole, Evelyn Green Blue Hole and another near the seashore at the S-bend located south of The Bluff settlement make for added birding adventure. However, it is advisable to contact the Bahamas Tourist Office in South Andros for local guide assistance. It is very easy to get lost or injured in this rugged terrain, insect repellant and protective clothing are essential. Accomodations and rental cars are available, and the airport at Congo Town provide daily flights to Nassau.

Key biodiversity
On South Andros you may find most of the listed resident landbirds including the elusive Great Lizard Cuckoo, Bahama Yellowthroat, Bahama Oriole, White-crowned Pigeon, Doves, Bahama Mockingbird, Northern Mockingbird, Thick-billed Vireo and Bananaquit. Shorebirds, waterbirds and migrant warblers are also found in this site. This site also gained prominence for being the only known nesting site of Cave Swallows in the Bahamas. They are reported to nest between early April and late July in limestone cavities of the blue holes. This was evident in June 2007 when they were recorded in ponds eight and nine at Nine Tasks Blue Hole and at Twins Blue Hole. The ponds/blue holes have the potential for being the habitat for many species of waterbirds including grebes, ducks, coots, moorhens, herons and egrets. Flycatchers also feed busily over the water. Yellow-crowned Night Herons were nesting at all the above-mentioned blue holes visited in June 2007.


Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2020) Important Bird Areas factsheet: Driggs Hill to Mars Bay. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 10/07/2020.